What Makes a Good Reference Photo?

What Makes a Good Reference Photo?

April 18, 2018

If You're the Photographer...

FOCUS ON THE EYE

The seat of the soul and captivating part of the final painting, be sure to get the eyes in focus. When they show character in the photo, they will in the painting.

If using a camera phone, you can use the touch screen to select the focus area.  

ZOOM

Don't use the zoom, just get closer to your subject. Will result in a higher definition. It's ok to have extra space around your subject, I will crop to the canvas ratio and ensure a beautiful layout.

PERSPECTIVE MATTERS

The angle you capture your subject in will be the angle in the painting.

 

LIGHTING

Dramatic lighting can make or break a photo reference. Natural morning or evening sunlight is best. If you can position the subject with part of the face in shadow and part in direct light, the illusion of depth appears.  

 

ACTION SHOTS

Is your subject energetic? Try some action shots. Many cameras have a "rapid fire" feature upon where you can take multiple shots per second.

COPYWRITE

If your perusing the internet for a reference photo, try Instagram or another form of social media where we can obtain permission to use the photographer's work. No one likes a thief ;)

 

THANK YOU FOR TAKING THE TIME TO GET ME A STUNNING REFERENCE PHOTO.

I WILL CREATE A PIECE THAT WILL BRING EXCITEMENT AND LIFE TO YOUR SPACE.

 

Photo by Firza Pratama on Unsplash




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